What’s New and Beneficial about Asparagus

What’s New and Beneficial about Asparagus

Recent research has underscored the value of careful storage and speedy consumption of fresh asparagus.asparagus-prepared

The key scientific finding here involves respiration rate. Like all vegetables, asparagus doesn’t instantly “die” when it is picked, but instead, continues to engage in metabolic activity. This metabolic activity includes intake of oxygen, the breaking down of starches and sugars, and the releasing of carbon dioxide.

The speed at which these processes occur is typically referred to as “respiration rate.” Compared to most other vegetables, asparagus has a very high respiration rate. At 60 milligrams of carbon dioxide release per hour per 100 grams of food (at a refrigerator temperature of 41°F), this rate is five times greater than the rate for onions and potatoes; three times greater than the rate for lettuce and tomato; and twice as great as the rate for cauliflower and avocado.

Asparagus’ very high respiration rate makes it more perishable than its fellow vegetables, and also much more likely to lose water, wrinkle, and harden. By wrapping the ends of the asparagus in a damp paper or cloth towel, you can help offset asparagus’ very high respiration rate during refrigerator storage. Along with this helpful step, you will want to consume asparagus within approximately 48 hours of purchase.
Wild asparagus (Asparagus racemosus) is a species of asparagus with a long history of use in India and other parts of Asia as a botanical medicine.

Many medicinal qualities of wild asparagus have been associated with phytonutrients present in its roots, and especially one type of phytonutrients called saponins.

Recent research has shown that the species of asparagus most commonly consumed in the U.S. (Asparagus officinalis) also contains saponins, not only in its root portion put also in its shoots. Saponins found in common, everyday asparagus include asparanin A, sarsasapogenin, and protodioscin. Asparagus even contains small amounts of the diosgenin – one of the best-studied saponins that is especially concentrated in yam.

Saponins in food have repeatedly been shown to have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties, and their intake has also been associated with improved blood pressure, improved blood sugar regulation, and better control of blood fat levels.
You may have heard about two foods — chicory root and Jerusalem artichoke — that are widely recognized as providing health benefits for our digestive tract.

These health benefits involve a special area of digestive support called “prebiotics” offered by a compound known as inulin. Both chicory root and Jerusalem artichoke contain rich concentrations of inulin, a unique type of carbohydrate called a polyfructan.

Unlike most other carbs, inulin doesn’t get broken down in the first segments of our digestive tract. It passes undigested all the way to our large intestine.

Once it arrives at our large intestine, it becomes an ideal food source for certain types of bacteria (like Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli) that are associated with better nutrient absorption, lower risk of allergy, and lower risk of colon cancer.

Researchers now know that asparagus belongs among the list of foods that contain inulin. While approximately 5% lower in inulin than chicory root and Jerusalem artichoke, asparagus is a food that contains a valuable amount of unique carb and may provide our digestive tract with some equally unique health benefits. WHFoods

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Eating Asparagus May Prevent a Hangover ???

The amino acids and minerals found in asparagus extract may alleviate alcohol hangover and protect liver cells against toxins

Chronic alcohol use causes oxidative stress on the liver, as well as unpleasant physical effects, associated with a hangover. Cellular toxicities were significantly alleviated in response to treatment with the extracts of asparagus leaves and shoots. These results provide evidence of how the biological functions of asparagus can help alleviate alcohol hangover and protect liver cells

Asparagus officinalis is a common vegetable that is widely consumed worldwide and has long been used as an herbal medicine due to its anticancer effects.

It also has antifungal, anti-inflammatory and diuretic properties”. Food is medicine

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Vegetables are a rich source vitamins and varying amounts of protein,depending on the type of vegetables..

They provide fibre and aid the body with the digestion of food and the prevention of constipation.

Vegetables play a big part in a healthy lifestyle.

In our quest for a healthy life, sometimes we need a little help !

Self-monitoring is a tried and true weight-loss strategy.

Most people know to keep a daily food diary. It’s also helpful to weigh yourself regularly—a few times per week, if you’re trying to lose weight—and track it on a graph so you can increase your awareness of how your behaviours impact your weight.

This graph provides a visual reminder to stay on track, and seeing a declining slope reinforces you when you’re on track.

This is one of the “apps”  you can find in FitChoice.

For more information go to http://pleine-vie.ineways.eu  select language and discover FitChoice

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About Maggie Pascoe

By helping enough people achieve what they want to achieve, you will achieve your goals !l My aim is to help people get what they want in life, to improve their health & life & have the same satisfaction by helping others.

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